A very partial list of people who are not white men

In response to a tweet from @jennihayman, I did a quick scan through my endnote database and extracted this list of women in/around learning technology and the learning sciences whose work I’ve found particularly insightful and inspiring.

I hope this is useful enough to those of you who are searching for people to read/follow to compensate for the grief I will get from people I’ve mistakenly left off the list.

Patricia AlexanderMegan BangBrigid Barron
Sian BayneMargaret BearmanHelen Beetham
Sue BennettKate BielaczycJoan Bliss
Henny BoshuizenJos BoysAngela Brew
Ann BrownAlison Carr-ChellmanLucila Carvalho
Michelene ChiBetty CollisGrainne Conole
Laura CzerniewiczMadeleine DahlgrenGloria Dall’Alba
Crina DamşaLinda Darling-HammondSharon Derry
Lone Dirckinck-HolmfeldNina Bonderup DohnAnne Edwards
Rachel EllawayRandi EnglePeg Ertmer
Keri FacerNancy FalchikovTara Fenwick
Marilyn FleerDedre GentnerLesley Gourlay
Julia GouveaKris GutiérrezLinda Harasim
Nira HativaCaroline HaythornthwaiteSara Hennessy
Davinia Hernández-LeoJan HerringtonStar Roxanne Hiltz
Cindy Hmelo-SilverVivien Hodgsonbell hooks
Celia HoylesSarah HowardMizuko Ito
Sanna JarveläKaren JensenYael Kali
Judy KayJanet KolodnerKaren Könings
Deanna KuhnKristiina KumpulainenSusanne Lajoie
Susan LandDiana LaurillardJean Lave
Nancy LawSari Lindblom-YlanneAllison Littlejohn
Kirsti LonkaMarcia LinnRose Luckin
Lina MarkauskaiteLucia MasonRobin Mason
Susan McKenneyErica McWilliamBarbara Means
Naomi MiyakeRoxana MorenoBonnie Nardi
Monika NerlandRikke NørgårdDiana Oblinger
Gale ParchomaTrena PaulusDonatella Persico 
Francesca PozziMimi ReckerLauren Resnick
Rita RicheyMargaret RielBarbara Rogoff
Jen RossAlison RossettGilly Salmon
Annalisa Sannino Maggi Savin-BadenEileen Scanlon
Marlene ScardamaliaSylvia ScribnerAnna Sfard
Val ShuteChristine SinclairBridget Somekh
Chris Steeples (Smith)Vanessa SvilhaKate Thompson
Mary ThorpeSherry TurkleSimone Volet
Stella VosniadouShirin VossoughiBarb Wasson
Bev WoolfPam WoolnerPippa Yeoman
   

ICCE 2020

28th International Conference on Computers in Education

Here’s a copy of the slide deck I used in my keynote at the ICCE conference (25th November 2020). There are more slides/ideas in here than I discuss/use in the actual talk. Notably, there are a couple of slides very near the end containing follow-up references.

Aligning education, digital and learning space strategies: an ecological approach

These are slides to accompany the presentation I made at ITaLI, University of Queensland, this morning.

Rob Ellis and I have a chapter on this in a new book edited by Ron Barnett and Norman Jackson.

Our book length treatment was published earlier this year by Routledge.

Tasks, activities and student learning

Talk at ITaLI, University of Queensland, 7th November 2019

The following references are cited in the slides/talk. Slides themselves are here: Goodyear UQ 2019-Nov-07 condensed.

Bearman, M., & Ajjawi, R. (2019). Can a rubric do more than be transparent? Invitation as a new metaphor for assessment criteria. Studies in Higher Education, 1-10.

Beckman, K., Apps, T., Bennett, S., Dalgarno, B., Kennedy, G., & Lockyer, L. (2019). Self-regulation in open-ended online assignment tasks: the importance of initial task interpretation and goal setting. Studies in Higher Education, 1-15.

Biggs, J., & Tang, C. (2007). Teaching for quality learning at university: what the student does (3rd ed.). Buckingham: Open University Press.

Carvalho, L., & Goodyear, P. (Eds.). (2014). The architecture of productive learning networks. New York: Routledge.

Ellis, R., & Goodyear, P. (2010). Students’ experiences of e-learning in higher education: the ecology of sustainable innovation. New York: RoutledgeFalmer.

Forbes, D., & Gedera, D. (2019). From confounded to common ground: Misunderstandings between tertiary teachers and students in online discussions. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology 35(4). doi:10.14742/ajet.3595

Goodyear, P. (2015). Teaching as design. HERDSA Review of Higher Education, 2, 27-50. Retrieved from http://www.herdsa.org.au/system/files/HERDSARHE2015v02p27.pdf

Hadwin, Allyson, and Philip Winne. 2012. “Promoting Learning Skills in Undergraduate Students.” In Enhancing the Quality of Learning, edited by John R. Kirby and Michael J. Lawson, 201–27. New York: Cambridge University Press

Krippendorff, K. (2006). The semantic turn: a new foundation for design. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press.

Laurillard, D., Kennedy, E., Charlton, P., Wild, J., & Dimakopoulos, D. (2018). Using technology to develop teachers as designers of TEL: Evaluating the learning designer. British Journal of Educational technology, 49(6), 1044-1058. doi:10.1111/bjet.12697

Shuell, T. (1986). Cognitive conceptions of learning. Review of Educational Research, 56(4), 411-436.

Suchman, L. (1987). Plans and situated actions: the problem of human-machine communication. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Sun, S. Y. H., & Goodyear, P. (2019). Social co-configuration in online language learning. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 36(2), 13-26. doi:https://doi.org/10.14742/ajet.5102

Wisner, A. (1995a). Understanding problem building: ergonomic work analysis. Ergonomics, 38(3), 595-605.

Wisner, A. (1995b). Situated cognition and action: implications for ergonomic work analysis and anthropotechnology. Ergonomics, 38(8), 1542-1557.

The Sydney Business School ACAD video (3 mins) is here: https://player.vimeo.com/video/302378219

Discussion, collaborative knowledge work and epistemic fluency

G&Z2007

I received a request for this paper earlier today. It started life as a keynote at the Networked Learning conference in Lancaster in 2006. Maria Zenios visited us in Sydney later that year, and we were able to work together and develop a more extensive treatment of the issues. We used a recent paper in BJES by Effie MacLellan as a springboard. We combined ideas from Stellan Ohlsson, Allan Collins, Dave Perkins and Carl Bereiter to introduce epistemic tasks, forms, games and fluency. Then we linked this with research on learning through discussion by Helen Askell-Williams and Michael Lawson and by Rob Ellis and myself, to distinguish between weaker and stronger forms of collaborative knowledge building. If you’re serious about helping students prepare for work in complex knowledge creating jobs, then you need the stronger form.

I hadn’t reread this paper for a while, and I think it still stands up quite well. As of today, it’s had 87 citations, not all of them by me. I’m also glad to see that research on learning through discussion in higher education has been growing in the last 10 years. The literature was quite thin in 2006/7.

In 2008, Lina Markauskaite and I wrote a grant proposal that allowed us to do some of the ‘cognitive anthropology’ hinted at in this paper. The outcomes, and a much richer understanding of matters that were only sketched in the BJES paper, can be found in our ‘magnum opus’ – Markauskaite, L., & Goodyear, P. (2017). Epistemic fluency and professional education: innovation, knowledgeable action and actionable knowledge. Dordrecht: Springer.

 

Slides from my invited lecture at ascilite

ascilite title slide

This may not be the final version, but will have most of the references, ideas etc.

goodyear-ascilite-2016-v7-ppt

Analysis and design for complex learning …

Over the last year or so, there has been a good deal of online soul-searching about the field or discipline of educational technology: about its nature, foundations, scope and purpose – including whether and how it can make a difference to policy and practice in higher education, which is ascilite’s home ground. In this talk, I want to focus on the production of educational design knowledge: knowledge that is useful to people who design for other people’s learning. I will use, as an illustrative example, the ACAD framework – an Activity-Centred approach to Analysis and Design – to make some points about the creation of useful design knowledge. In so doing, I hope to (a) draw attention to a family of approaches to research and development that are particularly well-suited to understanding and improving complex learning systems through local action, and (b) explain why analysis and design processes involve epistemic fluency (an ability to work with different kinds of knowledge and ways of knowing). The talk should be of interest to anyone who is concerned about connecting inquiry and action in educational technology.

Understanding the nature and impact of wicked problems and unpredictable futures on employability

Screen Shot 2017-06-03 at 11.18.11 pm

September 2016 – a brief presentation at Joy Higgs’s EPEN seminar (Education, Practice and Employability Network). Videos here.

The Kilpi quote is from

Kilpi, Esko. (2016). Perspectives on new work: exploring emerging conceptualizations. Retrieved from: http://www.sitra.fi/en/julkaisu/2016/perspectives-new-work-1